Author Archives: brusselsdiplomatic

EICMA,THE SUCCESS OF THE 76TH EDITION ON THE WEB AS WELL

The success of EICMA 2018 wins over the Internet as well. The most important Milanese week in the world for fans of two wheels was marked not only by the number of previews that were presented, pavilions that were visited and products that were seen close-up, but also by the amount of digital emotions that were aroused.
The 76th Edition of the International Bicycle, Motorcycle and Accessories Show closes at Fiera Milano-Rho with record numbers on the Internet as well. On the days of EICMA, the press offic e and the online editorial office took 10,000 photos, filmed over 47 hours of footage produced in six editing stations, published 160 pieces of news on the website of the event,di stributed 15 institutional press releases, edited 52 video footages of the stands and covered over 250 km in the exhibition grounds. All the se contents, including through the official digital and social platforms reached countless fans and professionals, with more than 900,000 visits to the eicma.it website and over 30,000 downloads of the dedicated app.
The numbers concerning the activity on the EICMA social channels are also amazing: 1.3 million users reached and over 6.4 million views of the posts on Facebook and more than 850,000 impressions on YouTube, with 200,000 minutes of views and almost 58,000 unique viewers. The Instagram channel, which during the event recorded +72% in the number of followers, was also very successful, reaching over 750,000 people with the photos and videos posted and totalizing some 2.5 million impressions. This trend was also confirmed by the popularity obtained by more than one hundred stories posted on the social media owned by Facebook, which totalized almost one million impressions. “ The social media, and more in general the Internet, not only made the competition global to involve new users, but,” commented the President of EICMA Andrea Dell’Orto , “they were at the same time cause and effect of the assertion of an increasingly demanding public of fans, that we were able to engage and win over with the quality of the content s produced. Approaching the Internet with quality is an exciting challenge and is also an advantage for the companies that choose EICMA to exhibit their products.
The digital success of this edition fills us with satisfaction, because we record another important stage in boosting our digital strategy.”
Antonio Gala
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Fujitsu: Co-Creation for Success

This year, Fujitsu World Tour 2018, which stopped in Brussels on June 7, highlighted the “Co-Creation for Success“.

6 start-ups from the Hive Brussels network presented their innovations to more than 300 of Fujitsu’s most important customers and partners. As part of the “Labs Battle”, each start-up had 5 minutes to convince the public and the jury of the potential of their innovation. The laureate was n-Auth specialized on security of sensitive data.

We interviewed Mr. Yves de Beauregard, Managing Director Fujitsu Benelux who explained: “Today, digital co-creation is moving to a new phase, from concept to the creation of new opportunities. Our unique capabilities in advanced technologies, such as artificial intelligence (AI) and the Internet of Things, combined with know-how, achieve this goal, delivering true innovation and business value.

The complexity of Artificial Intelligence (AI) is more then a usage.  As example we have used AI in Order to develop a non destructive testing that’s the example of Siemens Gamesa using AI to analyse images and data in order to ensure that the wings of the windmills are produced with the highest quality possible because it is very expensive for those companies that have the necessity to dismantled in order to change the wings. For so far this is done by human beings that they are really checking and also using the experience in order to look after the quality of those wings . This is a typical example where the AI has actually got to learn what humans are looking after and ones the AI has learned, it can apply very easily to a massive data informations, in order to really detect what is not in line with the expectations.”

 What are the other applications of AI?

“Another example AI applications is in the medical industry. We have been using AI together with San Carlo hospital in Madrid, supporting doctors in case of psychiatric treatment and at first when they go to analysing which sickness has the patient. In the psychiatric treatment there is a number of interviews that are needed to really understand what is the behaviour and what are the symptoms to define the actual sickness. For this reason, psychiatry is not that digital. We developed together with S. Carlo Hospital a system based on AI that really try to measure the behaviour, the comportment, the answers of the questions submitted to the patients and therefore that are able to support doctors in making a diagnosis on what is the actual sickness that the patient is suffering . Therefore, this application help patient to get treated quicker and helps doctors, who have to do less interviews in order to define the proper sickness and, of course, it also helps public money because it really support the entire chain to do better, quicker and less expensive.”

The second topic is Cyber security.   

“Fujitsu has been recently nominated as one of the top leader in cybersecurity. We see the recent attack from malware. I am proud to say that none of the Fujitsu customer, have been drastically impacted. We are effecting protecting our customer proactively and reactively. The business of Fujitsu in cyber security significantly improving and growing. Number of new customers, new logos and new companies come and ask us to support them with regard to cyber security.”

With the Blockchain centre recently inaugurated in Brussels which development you can see?

“We are actually very amazed by the number of projects and request coming after the inauguration of the Blockchain centre in Brussels. We were definitely too shy in our plans. We are very intrigue by the number of companies that are actually embracing Blockchain technologies, in order to help them because is not easy to understand what is the value that such technologies could bring to your business. We have developed a kind of support that really help those companies to understand what means Blockchain for their business model, for their customers. In the same time we are moving  ahead with our research for Blockchain for smart cities and new projects keep on having a leading position on that market.”

Why do you think is an asset choose Brussels for the Blockchain centre?

Three most important reason. The first reason is that in Belgium there is a culture of settlement. There is a number of company working on functional settlement located in Brussels. So the culture of working as a chain or being in the middle of a chain, support people from the business to stream line, the processes, they are able to work better together is something that is strongly in Belgium. The second reason is obviously, because Brussels is located in the centre of Europe. The proximity with European institutions and finally also the language skills that is present in Belgium.”

How do you collaborate with Japan?

On Artificial Intelligence, cyber security and Blockchain there is a very strong collaboration with Japan. There is actually a very strong relationship. We can benefit in Europe also from the technology advancement that our colleagues have in Japan. Fujitsu is indeed a market leader in Japan and the biggest part of R&D done by Fujitsu is still predominantly in Japan. If we want to benefit from those R&D as quick as we can, we need to have those strong relationships with Japan.”

How was important for you to collaborate for 0 Plastic Rivers initiative?

I truly believe that a company in whatever the business is operating is a social body. That means we also have the responsibility to the society, to the next generation and to the environment. One of the stakeholders we need to be very careful is our environment and we believe that this initiative is very interesting. In 0 Plastic Rivers initiative I believe that sensor technologies and Artificial intelligence technologies, could really help in managing plastic waste issue by detecting plastics in the water. It is an important topic that matter to us and on which we believe. We can have an added value.”

Henry Borzi

Electric Vehicles and charging stations: best practices from Europe and Italy

Electric Vehicles and charging stations: best practices form Europe and Italy. Changing the behavior for a cleaner future

The 2nd Regional Stakeholder Meeting conference of EV Energy, hosted by Partner EUR S.p.A in its facilities in Rome last 19th of October 2017, involved experts and key stakeholders from Greenit Amsterdam region, Flevoland Province, Stockholm County Council, Chamber of Commerce of Barcelona, Kaunas University of Technology and the Municipalities Association of Anci Lazio, including representatives of ENEL S.p.A., GLS Italy, UMPI and the Mobility Service Agency of the City of Rome.

They all agreed that many cities and regions are setting tougher environmental goals than national governments to limit air pollution and to achieve the goals of the 2015 Paris climate agreement to curb greenhouse gas emissions.

Zero emissions areas could mean more parks, pedestrian areas or roads where only electric powered vehicles could enter to make cities more attractive places to live. On this topics, Mariarosaria Marziali in charge of communication by Anci Lazio interviewed some attendees.

Marco Ghetti from UMPI Italian private company declared that “unfortunately e-infrastructures are not ready yet in our cities but existing infrastructures and assets can be exploited and turned into a e-mobility service network for EVs, starting from public lighting. “This is what UMPI can do and for sure in the next 15 years big part of the mobility transition will be completed”.

Donatas_Černiauskas from a Lithuanian ESCO company said that his ESCO is signing agreements with city authorities to develop charging system for EVs. However, there is still a relevant criticism as the National governments do not have yet target and goals for EVs and we don’t know yet who can manage the process of the mobility transition.

More optimistic was Cristian Bardaji from the Chamber of Commerce of Catalunia because a Strategic Plan 2016-2019 for the development of charging infrastructure for EVs has been implemented in Catalunia. With a budget of € 6 Million in 3 years Catalunia is implementing 100 charging stations to fast roads, 400 semi-fast charging stations and 25.000 charging points linked. Therefore, there are very good news from Catalunia. Cristian Bardaji explained that this choice of the Region is due to the fact that citizens ask for clean air.

Enrico Tagliaferri Manager of the Italian enterprise Share’ngo for Rome is optimistic as well about the future of the electric mobility in Italy. The plan of Share’ngo free-floating car sharing service is to introduce 2.000 new EVs in Milan and Rome. Share’ngo wants to create its own charging stations very soon, in order to quickly encounter the needs of the consumers.

Alberto Piglia, Head ofe- Mobility of Global Business Line e-Solutions for Enel strongly has believed in electric mobility since 2008. Enel implemented the first charging stations in Pisa in 2009. Today it is even possible to drive from Rome to Milan, thanks to the new fast charging stations installed in the highway last September. The investment plan of Enel is to install 7.000 new fast charging stations in Italy very soon. In addition, Enel to create a digital intelligence in order to manage the “batteries with wheels” in the best way to balance the power.

Michael Erman, Regional planner at County Council Stockholm, is optimistic as well. Stockholm is one of the most ambitious cities in EU to become one of the world’s leading clean vehicle cities by 2030. To achieve this, the City is developing e-infrastructures. 500 charging points on-street will be installed by 2020. Michael declared that the first objective must remain “local transport to be strengthened” while the second one is to allow people to buy EVs instead of polluting cars. But the EVs must be less expensive! An ongoing study in Sweden is the electrification of the public fleets (buses) that implies the implementation of charging facilities in all the

country. Michael concluded by saying that “Public transport and IT are very important in the context of the mobility transition”.

Remarkable is the “self-experimentation” of Hugo Niesing who is the designer, operator, subject, analyst, user and reporter of the experiment. From 2013 onward Hugo Niesing has successfully experimented a smart energy management in his house, producing and consuming energy, together with energy storage in an EV. He installed a 30m2 of solar panels, attaching an EV with available battery capacity of 10Kwh. Prior to the V2H installation and only with the aid of solar panels, 26% of the energy instantly consumed by the household came directly from this renewable energy source. But with the addition of the EV in the energy system, this self-sufficiency increased to 60%. This experiment paves the way for large scale adoption of renewable energies in urban environments. It is in fact in progress in a neighborhood of Amsterdam: the EVs act as energy storage.

Therefore, Hugo Niesing is completely right to be very optimistic regarding the mobility transition. It would be enough to follow his example.

Mariarosaria Marziali

Europe’s Urban Energy-Mobility Transition Demonstration

Europe’s Urban Energy-Mobility Transition Demonstration, upscaling & uptake in city-planning, how to achieve adequate policy measures and large-scale implementation.

European cities are moving massively into electric mobility, especially electric vehicles, but also buses, freight, water transport bikes mopeds etc. This is one way to create a healthier city, besides that renewable energy in the city is also growing rapidly, as this is the most viable clean source of energy in the city area.

This session is about the combination of Electric Mobility and renewables, facilitated by ICT. The 4 participating projects are all involved in various initiatives at European level, demonstrating how these two sectors can enforce instead of blocking each other.

Both of these technologies are reaching a market matureness, although we see governments struggling with the charging infrastructure development, organisation and financing.

The largest challenge observed in the last 5 years is how to arrange their integration at a larger scale in the city. Growth in solar renewable energy in the city creates an energy production peak between 10 and 16 hours, the overall energy demand peaks of a city are between 7-9 in the morning and 17-20 in the afternoon/evening.

Now we already observe the impact of these mismatches in different cities, not being able to electrify their bus fleet or limiting the EV charging area or intensity. Also the electricity grid faces problems in not so-well connected areas, having to be shut down during peak periods due to grid capacity constraints. On top of this we observe a rapid growth in electricity instead of gas or other fossil fuel in (North West) Europe. These problems will aggravate rapidly if we do not act now and invest in our future, especially zero emission mobility, clean energy, smart storage (in EVs and 2nd life batteries) flexible energy usage. Europe cannot afford it to dimension our electricity grids on peak moments that are occurring a couple of hours during the day during a couple of months….

I. European activities on different policy moments

Technology experiences Resourcefully demonstrated in a home-experiment how you can more than double the energy autonomy by smart energy storage in electric vehicles. This approach and philosophy is now further put into practice in the Smart clean Energy and Electric Vehicles 4 the City (SEEV4-City) project with 6 pilots all about the co-operation between renewables and electric mobility through different experiments. Varying from a single home with solar energy, EV mobility and a small storage unit to larger organisations, both public and private, it includes Europe’s largest EV charging garage (100 EVs) in Oslo and the innovative energy services for the clean balancing of the national grid with 2nd life batteries in the Amsterdam Johan Cruijff ArenA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Towards upscaling and replication, the CleanMobilEnergy project demonstrates the upscaling to neighbourhoods and more complex situations, with multiple energy sources storage and consumption, steered by one (to be developed transnationally) energy management system.

Planning: The next step in the policy cycle demonstrates the need for proper embedding into municipality planning, this is realised in the Simpla project and in this sequence the next phase in the cycle addresses how good policies and experiences at different levels are required.

EV ENERGY is about finding adequate policies and good experiences, now still too fragmented, in The Netherlands charging infrastructure is booming, while Norway has the best EV incentives and policy on local renewables vary

strong among the EU states.

II. Next steps to make this work at large

In order to reach a more visible impact and integration with the mobility sector as a whole, large demonstration is required, where all mobility practitioners participate, including large distance mobility assets, such as trains metro, busses for the intercity connections between the urban hubs, participating in Europe’s mobility-energy exchange transition..

Bottom line, technically & organisationally we are perfect able to create a transition path in Europe, but this requires large scale visible, well-functioning demonstrations, now here we need involvement of all actors, the market, good regulations, brave politicians at local and regional level, and financial support. The possibility for such a scaled-up experiment in Europe would really be a market changer.

This will not emerge automatically, the mobility sector has taken up the challenge and requires limited support in this process, but the grid operators (DSO’s), the relevant build-environment actors (housing companies, real estate agencies etc.) the integrators (between mobility – energy – storage), working on:

1.Detailed forecast 2.Good real-time monitoring 3. Well determined smart interventions and the renewable sector in the city do need this.

On 5th June, in the framework of the Sustainable Energy Week will be host the event Demonstration, upscaling & uptake in city-planning, how to achieve adequate policy measures and large-scale implementation Moderator: Hugo Niesing, as you can see in the below Agenda.

 

 

THE ENERGY TRANSITION: NEW DIALOGUES BETWEEN THE CITY OF ROME & LOCAL STAKEHOLDERS

 

The City of Rome is strongly involving stakeholders in shaping the city’s future, particularly, regarding the energy transition.

In fact, stakeholders and organisations will be very soon involved in key strategic decision-making to help the City administration of Rome to install infrastructures for charging electric vehicles.

On the other side, it will be easier for the local stakeholders wishing to install electric infrastructures in Rome. This because the City of Rome will renounce to request them the taxes regarding the “occupation of public land” as well as the building permit.

In addition, The City Administration decided to increase the possibility of commercial surface inside the areas of electric charging distributors. This opportunity will repay the investment of the stakeholders on the electric charging points.

But there’s more: an App will be also created in which citizens can propose to the Local Authority the areas of the city where to install electric infrastructures. Then, the City Administration will check the availability of the areas to be equipped with electric charging stations.

The City Assembly Resolution 92/2017 containing the Rome’s Plan of Electric Mobility 2017-2020 was in fact approved last 19 of April 2018.

The Resolution regards the “Regulations for the construction and management of public access systems to be used exclusively for the recharging of vehicles powered by electricity”.

The Rome’s City Councilor for Mobility, Linda Meleo, explained during the City Assembly that the Plan is an important act, because it introduces the first Electric Mobility Plan which defines addresses on what and how electric mobility must be implemented. In addition, it defines the new horizontal and vertical signage linked to the stalls for charging electric vehicles and introduces a framework of rules for the installation of electric infrastructures in the city.

The Plan aims to a minimum target that is to provide the capital city with at least 700 electric charging points, distributed in a capillary way also in the most peripheral areas, by 2020. Through this Plan, Rome intends to achieve more ambitious objectives in order to become an attractive pole of electric mobility. Six macro areas have been identified, going from the city centre to the peri-urban areas, in order to ensure the installation of more electric charging points: from the service stations of the “GRA”, the Rome’s ring road, to the ancient Aurelian Walls, in order to meet the needs of citizens, so as to allow citizens to recharge their own vehicle wherever they are.

The regulations for the implementation of the electric infrastructures in Rome establish, as follows:

• Subjects entitled to submit an application for the implementation of charging electric points

• Technical constraints for the applications

• Technical documentation and building permit procedures

• Duration of the building permit and guarantees

• Technical characteristics of the electric infrastructures

• Stall signaling

• Management, information and integration constraints; monitoring and penalties

• Exemption from building permit charges

• Transitional rules for the managers of the charging stations activated before the entry into force of the Regulation

This Regulation fits perfectly with the actions undertaken by EV ENERGY project, such as the meetings with stakeholders carried out during 2017-2018.

Claudio Bordi

EU to modernised trade defence rules

“With today’s approval by the Council, we are very close to having the necessary tools to tackle unfair trading practices even more effectively. The EU stands for open and rules-based trade, but we must also ensure that others do not take advantage of our openness. I now look forward to the adoption of the new rules by the European Parliament to allow for their swift entry into force.” Said trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmström.

The Council gave a formal approval to the political agreement reached between the Commission, the Council and the European Parliament on 5 December 2017 to modernise the EU’s trade defense instruments.The changes to the EU’s anti-dumping and anti-subsidy regulations will make the EU’s trade defence instruments more adapted to the challenges of the global economy: they’ll become more effective, transparent and easier to use for companies. In some cases they will also enable the EU to impose higher duties on dumped products. The new rules will shorten the current investigation period and make the system more transparent. The companies will benefit from an early warning system that will help them adapt to the new situation in case duties are imposed. Smaller companies will also get assistance from a help desk, to make it easier for them to trigger and participate in trade defence proceedings. Also, in some cases, the EU will adapt its ‘lesser duty rule’ and may impose higher duties. This will apply to cases targeting imports of unfairly subsidised or dumped products from countries where raw materials and energy prices are distorted.

EU action reduces pollution from shipping in European coastlines

“Environmental rules deliver and protect our citizens’ quality of life when all sides involved work together to correctly apply them. The shared commitment by Member States, industry, and the maritime community as a whole is paying off. People living around protected sea areas can breathe cleaner and healthier air. And we have preserved the level playing field for industry.“Said Karmenu Vella, Commissioner for the Environment, Fisheries and Maritime Affairs.

Air pollution from sulphur oxides (SOx) emitted from ships has substantially dropped over the past years, a new compliance report shows. This positive trend is the result of joint efforts by Member States and the maritime industry to implement EU rules under the Sulphur Directive and opt for cleaner fuel. EU mechanisms to technically and financially support Member states to reduce emissions were an important factor in compliance. Since 2015, stricter limits in the designated ‘Sulphur Oxides Emissions Control Areas’ of the North and Baltic Seas have more than halved emissions, while the overall economic impact on the sector remained minimal. The report comes days after a landmark agreement at the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) on a strategy to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from international shipping by at least 50% by 2050. Both illustrate the commitment of the Commission to the goals of the Paris Agreement and to a Europe that protects with cleaner air for all. Exhaust gases from ships are indeed a significant source of emission and impact on citizens’ health and the environment.

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