Category Archives: energy

Naftogaz against Russia for Crimean assets

 

“Naftogaz of Ukraine and six companies part of the Naftogaz group – Chernomorneftegaz, Ukrtransgaz, Likvo, Ukrgazdobycha, Ukrtransnafta and Gaz Ukrainy – filed a lawsuit with the tribunal formed under the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague on compensation of losses due to Russia’s illegal seizure of the group’s assets in Crimea,” the statement said.

Naftogaz, the Ukraine’s energy giant has filed a lawsuit with The International Court of Justice in The Hague against Russia to recover $5bln for the assets lost in Crimea.

The judgement pronunciation of this case is expected by late 2018.

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Gazprom continues to strengthen its positions as supplier for Europe

Alexey Miller Chairman of the Gazprom Management Committee, held in St. Petersburg a conference call marking Oil and Gas Industry Workers Day.

Dear colleagues,

Let me wish you a happy Oil and Gas Industry Workers Day.

As usual, we celebrate our professional holiday with industrial accomplishments and new ambitious plans for the future.

Gazprom continues to strengthen its positions as a reliable supplier for Russian and foreign consumers. We ramp up production, break new export records, and advance toward the implementation of large-scale investment projects.

In the first eight months of 2017, we produced a total of 302.6 billion cubic meters of gas. It is a 20.1 per cent rise from last year, which translates into 50.7 billion cubic meters of gas in absolute terms.

Gazprom successfully fulfills its main purpose by providing Russian consumers with uninterrupted gas supplies. The Company’s gas deliveries to the domestic market grew by 8.4 per cent, or 11.2 billion cubic meters.

This year, we began to take stock of geological exploration in the Tambey group of fields in Yamal. Our gas reserves increased enormously, adding more than 4 trillion cubic meters. The overall amount of gas reserves in the Tambey group reached 6.7 trillion cubic meters.

The Yamal Peninsula is becoming Russia’s main gas production center. New transmission routes are evolving accordingly. We continue to expand the northern gas transmission corridor – the chief and most efficient route of gas supplies from central Russia to northwestern Europe.

As regards southern Europe, construction of the TurkStream gas pipeline is in full swing at the moment. Two microtunnels have been drilled and pipes have been pulled at the onshore section in Russia. As for the offshore section, a total of 220 kilometers have been laid along the two strings.

At the same time, we are building a formidable production complex in the east of Russia. It is the world’s largest investment project in the gas industry. The cornerstone of our strategy in Russia’s east is the Eastern Gas Program. We are actively working to set up new gas production centers in the Irkutsk Region and Yakutia. We are also ahead of schedule in constructing the Power of Siberia gas pipeline and the Amur gas processing plant.

We carry on with our gasification efforts in Russian regions. Access to natural gas dramatically improves the quality of life, especially in rural areas. This year, the Gasification Program covers 68 regions of the Russian Federation. There is no doubt that Gazprom will fulfill all of its obligations under this socially significant project.

Dear colleagues,

Gazprom is the biggest exporter of gas to Europe. In 2016, we delivered a record 179.3 billion cubic meters of gas to the region. Our exports keep growing in 2017. According to estimates, we exported as much as 126.3 billion cubic meters of gas to that market in eight months. It is 12.1 per cent higher than in the same period of 2016, an increase of 13.6 billion cubic meters.

This past winter, we repeatedly set new records for daily gas supplies to Europe. The absolute maximum was registered on January 27, 2017, at 636.4 million cubic meters. These record figures demonstrably show that, during peak loads, the Company can provide consumers on a timely basis with as much gas as they need. This solidifies Gazprom’s reputation as a reliable supplier.

It should be noted that even this summer our export pipelines worked in winter mode. As a matter of fact, last week we set an all-time record for August in terms of daily utilization of the Company’s gas export capacities. The record – 590.3 million cubic meters – exceeds the maximum figure registered during the winter peaks of the 2015–2016 season.

Such excellent results are encouraging. But they also pose a challenge. If we have to work this hard in summer, we will need to put in even more tireless and concerted effort during peak loads next winter. This applies to every single link in our process chain, from production to transmission to supervisory control to marketing. It is extremely important. After all, we work to bring gas, electricity, and heat to the homes of millions of people in Russia and abroad.

Dear colleagues,

Let us celebrate our professional holiday. Happy Oil and Gas Industry Workers Day!

I would like to wish you further success in your work, happiness, good health, prosperity, and all the best. And, as we say here at Gazprom, let us go on with our work!

EU-Switzerland: one step closer the Emissions Trading Systems

 “After much hard work on both sides, I am proud of the progress we have made with our Swiss colleagues. As the world’s largest cap and trade system, we have always aimed to promote the growth of the international carbon market.” Said climate Action and Energy Commissioner Miguel Arias Cañete.

The EU has  moved one step closer to linking its Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) for the first time. The Commission adopted two proposals to finalise an agreement with Switzerland on linking the EU ETS with the Swiss emissions trading system. Linking the European system with other systems expands opportunities for emissions reductions and reduces costs. Once the agreement with Switzerland takes effect, participants in the EU ETS will be able to use units from the Swiss system for compliance, and vice versa.  Negotiations between the Commission and Switzerland opened in 2010. A linking agreement was initialled in January 2016 but the signature and conclusion of the agreement were put on hold following the Swiss referendum. Following high-level contacts and a change in Swiss legislation, a meeting between Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and Swiss President Doris Leuthard in April (see press conference and SPEECH/17/897) opened the path for today’s decisions.

The Commission’s proposal for the signature of the agreement and a proposal for its conclusion (ratification) will now be discussed by the Council of Ministers of the European Union. The Council will require the consent of the European Parliament in order to conclude the agreement. Subject to final conclusion, the agreement could be signed before the end of the year. The entry into force would take place at the start of the year that follows ratification by both sides. The EU ETS is a key tool to tackle climate change with a view to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. It is the world’s first major carbon market and its biggest one. In October 2014, the European Council agreed on the 2030 climate and energy policy framework for the EU setting an ambitious economy-wide domestic target of at least 40% greenhouse gas emission reduction for 2030.

EU: action to tackle pollution from large combustion plants

The Commission takes action to tackle pollution from large combustion plants, such as power stations and district heating plants, which are responsible for about one-third of all air pollutants from industry. Large combustion plants – with a total thermal input of more than 50 megawatt, irrespective of the type of fuel used – are the biggest sectoral emitters in the EU. Therefore more cost-effective and technically feasible reductions of emissions are required. The adoption today of an implementing act by the Commission brings into effect “Best Available Technique” (BAT) conclusions for large combustion plants. These are techniques that are environmentally performing, economically viable and technically proven and developed through a transparent and thorough process over several years with EU Member States, industry and environmental NGOs. For all affected installations (around 3 500 in the EU) the Commission proposes that a review of their permits must happen within four years, so that by mid-2021 stricter EU-wide standards for all large combustion plants will be met. To tackle pollution from large combustion plants is in line with this Commission’s Energy Union priorities to steer the on-going energy transition towards a low emission economy. Clean energy transition is a priority for the Commission and the ”Clean Energy for all Europeans” package presented last November aims at providing a stable regulatory framework to deliver on the transformation of the energy system, which will be crucial for the implementation of the Paris Agreement.

EU-Eastern Partnership: cooperation on energy efficiency

The EU will continue to support partner countries in their efforts to become more energy efficient as a top priority, for the benefit of citizens across the region. Developing and implementing cost-effective energy efficiency policy is key for improving energy security, competitiveness, boosting economic growth, creating jobs – and it contributes to preventing climate change. We are focused on delivering concrete results, with a clear programme for cooperation until 2020 and beyond.” Said Johannes Hahn, Commissioner for European Neighbourhood Policy and Enlargement Negotiations.

Ministers of Foreign Affairs and Ministers in charge of energy efficiency from Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Republic of Moldova and Ukraine met on 10 July in Chisinau with Commissioner Hahn, Dominique Ristori, the European Commission’s Director General for Energy, and Jean-Christophe Belliard, Deputy Secretary General of the European External Action Service. Hosted by the Republic of Moldova, the dialogue included a foreign affairs session and a sectoral cooperation one on energy efficiency issues.

The Foreign Ministers exchanged views on the common challenges and best practice solutions, both in terms of foreign policy for the region and for advancing the necessary reforms for an increased state and societal resilience. In preparation for the upcoming Eastern Partnership Summit taking place on 24 November in Brussels, Commissioner Hahn, Deputy Secretary General Belliard and Foreign Ministers agreed on the need for concrete deliverables of high impact for the citizens, including the extension of the core TEN-T network to the partner countries, further steps on digital area and cheaper access to broadband internet, facilitating lending for SMEs in local currency, bolstering intraregional trade and a youth package.

On energy efficiency, Commissioner Hahn and Director General Ristori with the respective Ministers examined prospects for translating this priority into policy and investment opportunities. Following the example of Georgia and Ukraine, where joint missions of EU and IFIs identified key areas for short-term regulatory and institutional changes, other interested partner countries may benefit of this initiative. The EU, in close coordination with the partner governments and with the international financial institutions, would continue providing funds for energy efficiency projects and investments for companies, citizens and the public sector.

The latest energy data for all EU countries

Updated energy statistical datasheets for all EU countries have just been published by the European Commission. These datasheets cover the period 1990-2015 and make it possible to track how each country’s energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions patterns have changed over time. They contain an overview of the EU as a whole as well as individual country profiles, based on data from Eurostat and from the EU greenhouse gas monitoring mechanism. They are arranged in a tabular ready-to-use format, and are a very useful tool for anyone, both experts and members of the general public, looking for fast access to statistical data on energy in the EU and its member countries.

The datasheets include information on energy production, trading and consumption in each country, sorted by energy carrier (the means by which energy is converted into usable form) and economic sector. They also show how the deployment of solar energy has evolved over the years. They provide information such as the evolution of each country’s primary energy consumption (its total energy demand), countries’ energy efficiency, and their level of dependency on energy imports. In addition, they show how greenhouse gas emissions in individual sectors and at national level have varied since 1990.